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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
science on earth. and this is an odd kind of expedition for another reason. usually scientists go off in different directions, different times using their own tools. for mer the entire team was all together. 150 scientists and engineers balancing together, as it were, like on a huge skateboard creeping over the sand, up the down and hills and craters meters at a time for eight years. so it's something like being on a ship, on an early voyageover discovery. the scientists and the sailing crew were all having to travel together. they had to negotiate how long are we going to stay here in where are we going to go next in and what should we do at each site? and this requires a well coordinated understanding of their roles, schedules, resources, long-term plans and a clear chain of command. if you visited the science and engineering coordination meeting during the prime mission, which was the first 90 days of landing on mars in 2004, same thing we're going through now with curiosity during these 90 days, you could see the scientists up front on the bridge, as it were, with huge displays of
. bush administration. he's now a professor of political science and public policy at duke university. we thank you both for being with us. peter feaver, to you first. we heard governor romney today criticize the president broadly for not rejecting strongly enough america's influence in the world. yet when it came to specifics, we didn't hear many details. so let me just ask you about a couple of different places in the world. what about when it comes to iran. what exactly governor romney be doing differently right now? >> well, this is the criticism that the obama campaign has leveled at the romney campaign for not being detailed and specific enough. when it comes to iran, the president hasn't laid out a red line that he said clearly he would enforce. when asked to be precise about what it means for iran not to possess a nuclear weapon, the articulation of the red line, he's been vague and says he doesn't want to parse it further. i think there's a certain element of ambiguity about where you would draw the line precisely so as to avoid being trapped by it. but the other point to make is
scouting out locations or a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." this is about 30 minutes. >> if we could have everybody in the back come on up that's going to join us. thank you so much for your patience. the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block was around as. apparently -- thank you. people are nodding, so that's good. thank you very much. there may be some people still held up and we will welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter earnest, executive director and i'll ask you as a courtesy, to those for recording the program and to the speakers, the kind enough to turn off your cell phones, pdas and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. well, it's wonderful to see all of you here for the signing, and as we kick off the signing, i will show you a clip of the film based on the book for which you came to attempt the signing. so with that said we will go right ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. >> [inaudible] >> has shocked the civilized world. more than 60 american citizens continue to be held as hostages. >> six
will take a close look here at edwards life sciences. this is a company that deals a lot with your heart. heart valve therapy, critical care, cardiac surgery, they are cutting their sales outlook for the third quarter. a couple reasons why they are doing this. take a look at the two-day chart. down nearly 20% today. that is a huge move for a company that has had a nice run for the year 2012. they are blaming europe. also, the expected growth here in the u.s. was not what they anticipated. lori: thank you. move over baggage fees, long lines and delays. talking on your cell phone at 10,000 feet. what do you think? next season take a look at some of today's winners and losers. green mountain coffee. up almost 2% on the day. we will be right back. ♪ 0t[h7 [ male announcer ] what if you had thermal night-vision goggles, like in a special opsission? you'd spot movement, gather intelligence with minimal coateral damage. but rather than neutralizing enemies in their sleep, you'd be targeti stocks to trade. well, that's what trade architect's heat maps do. they make you a trading assassin. tra
. we know from the science that chemicals are ending up where they are not supposed to be and that is inside of our bodies. scientists can measure the chemicals getting into us, bio measuring. this is from the first chapter, indecent exposure, the intimate details. charlotte was surprised by the test results. mother of 2 among the first people to be tested for a wide range of industrial chemicals. test revealed that her body contained mercury lead cosmetics. i felt violated charlotte reported. she was upset about the pesticide. i never used them in my house, never on my lawn. i bought organic whenever i could. her body contained several variations of organic chlorines designed to attack nervous systems of insects. i never bought it. isn't that trespassing. i tell this in my story of mary broon. mary never felt called to be an environmentalist she was nursing her 6 month daughter olivia and a story had been done by texas tech where they looked at breast milk samples, all were contaminated with rocket fuel. i was stunned, i thought breast milk was as pure as it came fo
science. but in the end, broke my grand mother's heart was her 2 daughters could not come for their brother's funeral. when it explained to her that my aunts who lived in india and pack tan were considered enemy aliens we looked at us as we were inmates. we are brothers and sisters all of them are my children and went to grieve in the privacy of her prayers. we were quiet for sometime, both of us try to break away from the sounds of bombs and the sounds of grieve that accompany the tearing apart of people. 1 from the other. amy broke our silence. what do you mean pieces of your doll. i had 3 dolls all 3 were shanty. all 3 dolls were made of brittle plastic like material we called cutcha caw. they were hollow the different parts of their bodies were hooked with rubber bands. whatever held those 3 parts together they always broke within a few weeks and the dolls continued to exist in their separate components. i suspect my male cousin was the deconductor of the dolls. the grownups promised to reconstruct them but didn't have the time to follow up on their promises or forgot
location for a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." it's about thirty minutes. if we can have nerve the back come on. thank you for your patience. we have -- the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block here was horrendous. apparently thank you, people are nodding. that's good. thank you very much. so there may be some people held up still. we'll welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter, the executive directer. ly ask you as a court sei those who are recording the program and the speakers to be kind enough to turn off your cell phone, pda and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. that said we'll go ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. the people die. we want the six of them out. what we want is -- deliver the six by providing them with -- you can send them training wheels and get them to the board we are gatorade. it would take a miracle to get them out. what are we watching? i have an idea. there are canadian film crew for science fiction. we file together as a company. this is how we make a big movie. you want to c
to be less about public policy being guided by compromise and more about having it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having a view of the insured as a society and what as a society we gain from that. what of the consequences if we don't? if it has been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science is really being pushed out of some much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services that are based on the ranchers science. and that is a scary moment, regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal legal police are up at to what to require medical professionals to the mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country, and that in those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much m
. and a lot of bad news coming out of research by the australian institute of marine sciences that as you pointed out half of the coral in the great barrier reef has declined largely due to both tropical storms, a crown of thorns starfish that feeds on the coral up to 40% declined just from the starfish alone and of course climate change and coral bleaching. >> so storms, starfish, climate change. what can we do to stop the coral loss? >> well, this is some scary news. this is much more than anyone expected. but there is a little bit of a silver lining. we believe the crown of thorns starfish in their larva stages grow faster because of runoff and fertilizer off the coast of australia. so scientists are calling for vehicler controls on that runoff going into the reef which may help to reduce the population of the crown of thorns starfish and hopefully relieve some of the pressure. they believe up to 42% of the decline of the great barrier reef has been caused by extreme outbreaks of these crown of thorns starfish. so hopefully reducing runoff can have a positive impact and allow the reef
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. n you take a closer look.... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> in dividends we trust. even if the economy gets stronger and you expect the feds to start tightening. that is why tonight we are checking up on a group of stocks that are renowned for beautiful yields. the real estate investment trusts. why? consider the ishares dow jones real estate etf. you can't decide on a single reit so you buy the whole cohort instead. it is up 12.9%. but in the last few weeks, we have been worried because this has been body slammed. we want to know if this is a garden variety pull back or the start of something worse. tonight we are going off the char
right on through? like in the science fiction stories. why? why does it stop? how can i make contact with the table, if this is mostly empty space and the table is mostly empty space? how many say that there is no explanation for that? there is an explanation, gang. you know what it is? oh, nobody be knowing. one be knowing. so you guys didn't have a chance to read the book this weekend. check the neighbor-- see if the neighbor knows. why is it you don't fall through your chair? anyone have any ideas? anyone? trish. do the charges repel each other? yes, electrical charges, right on, wonderful. wonderful. remember, we talked about the atom here, these electrons repelling other electrons? any electrons on your seat? yes, any electrons on your seat? and when these electrons squished closer and closer, what do they do? begin with "r" end with "l". they repel and this is an electrical repulsion, my friend, between you and the chairs upon which you sit. let's put it this way. let's suppose this table-- pretend this table is a magnet. you guys know about magnets repelling. turn around, they
of systems all of which are so important to the asia-pacific region. and we'll continue all of our science and technology investments across the board. the third reason why we can carry out the rebalance is that we're shifting our posture forward and into the asia-pacific region; that is, not what we have, but where we put it is also changing. by 2020 we will have shifted 60% of our naval assets to the pacific. that's an historic change for the be united states navy. the marine corps will have up to 2500 marines on rotation in australia, we will have four la toral combat ships stationed forward in singapore, i was just aboard both in san diego last week, and we'll proceed fully to build out our military presence on guam and surrounding areas, which is an important strategic hub for the western pacific. we will begin to rotate b-1 bombers into the region augmenting the b-52 bombers already on continuous rotation. we've already deployed f-22s to kadima air force base in japan, and we will deploy the f-35 joint strike fighter to the region. differently, we're sending our newest assets to the
have the most government-funded research. we push the balance on science and technology, so our best innovators are here. in education, we now, well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to ld the world in college graduates. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers, we are now $2 trillion in deficits in terms of infrastructure. a great education, and get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on each one of these issues that are so vital to our greatest strength. i don't think we can remedy this . and on budget-funded research, it looks wike an e.k.g. heading for a heart attack. in terms of the things that have historically made us great on each one of those indices, i see us not going in the direction we should be going. for me that's the alarm bell and the wake-up call. >> are we as strong as we have ever been or are there ways you see measurable? >> it is on obvious we are not as strong as we have ever been. but also because the world was changed around us. we spent an awful lot of time, eff
the most government funded research to push the boundaries of science and technology so our best innovators and the entrepreneurs could pluck them and start these companies. if you think about that is a formula for success, and education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming out of high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers we are now $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration we have a policy to get a great education and then get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h-1b issues that are so vital for our future strength. fourth, the rules for incentivizing risk-taking and preventing recklessness. i don't think that we have in any way remedied that the way we want and on the government funded research if it looks like an ekg heading for a heart attack. i don't know if they are relative to what. all i know is in the things that have historically made us great, on each one of those i see us not g
. there is some corals that live for many thousands of yeernz we found through some of the science we do we can drill holes down to the center of the corals and look at annual growth rings and we can look at when, in fact, when the first agriculture in australia happened, we saw a change in the type of chemistry that the annual growth rings and coral were depositing. so we have seen a chronology of increased siltation, of increased fertilization, of
for inviting me. >> hong kong university of science and technology. very much appreciate your thoughts. let's give you a look at what's on the agenda in asia tomorrow. japan central bank begins its two-day policy meeting. the boj is likely to stand pat this time around but may signal more stimulus on the 30th of october. elsewhere, india posed september services pmi following strong numbers in august and cnbc will have an exclusive interview with malaysia's prime minister, so be sure to tune in for that. >>> back over this side of the world, business activity in the eurozone shows no sign of a rebound. the latest composite pmi figures for september fell to the low nest three years. france and spain saw a mild contraction as the country struggled with painful austerity measures. >>> meanwhile, growth in britain's sector services slowed in september. services pmi fell to 52.2 last month down from a reading of 53.7 in august. joining us now discuss is chris williamson, chief economist at market. good to have you onboard. i want to start out with the uk numbers because we've seen some move in t
on this one. you think of people like steve balmer, jim cramer. >> but there is science behind this. >> more testosterone. >> it's the testosterone that kills the hair. you're more aggressive. you're an aggressor. >> how do you keep your hair? >> if zucker was still -- i would be nicer, he has a full head of hair so i'm not afraid right now. if some guy who is unfortunately is bald happens to end up in a powerful position, it's not because of being bald, it's in spite of being bald. toupees look like crap. you can't buy a decent toupee. >> rarely bald anymore. maybe works in business, not in politics, i don't know. kong. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their global
on the science now in question. here's susan candiotti. >> reporter: former massachusetts chemist annie dookhan. >> could you tell us what happened. >> reporter: the state of massachusetts is accusing dookhan of tampering with drug evidence that could call into question at least 34,000 cases going back to 2003. 34,000. at the moment she faces only three charges. however, in boston alone, the d.a. estimates as many as 500 convicted felons could be set free. how big of a mess is this? >> at this point, susan, we don't know. >> reporter: at this lab now closed by the state dookhan allegedly mishandled drugs seized by police for evidence at trial. she allegedly estimated the amount of drugs at times by simply looking at them and certified some drugs as cocaine that are now testing negative. she didn't just write down the wrong thing. prosecutors accuse her of doctoring evidence to change test results. >> she would take known cocaine from an area that she knew was cocaine and actually add them to the sample to make it cocaine. >> incredible story. let's turn to cnn contributor paul callen for legal
. and that is what is missing from this. there is no penalty. this isn't rocket science. you can just easily say, the classic case now is they have it sitting there and they've offered to pay 5%. can you imagine going into irs and saying, here's what i'm going to pay you this year. just give me a pass on this. give you 5%. ain't going to happen. the multinational corporations happen every day and it is just as dishonest as they get comic. >> host: the point you make is so true. in 2003, congress succumbed to the argument was out of money, corp. of money sitting offshore. we'll pay kind of a token tax year. the whole purpose was supposedly to create jobs. well, later reports have disclosed that the companies that brought back the most money cut jobs, did not actually create jobs. so even when these things are put in place, there's no follow-up to enforce that means some penalty. >> well, it brings us back to a human model and politics because were in the midst of a political campaign. you talk about how the rich view of money and taxes than a dollar bill differently than working and middle-class
. and then for these, these are the breakthrough awards, these are based fully on science, innovation, products that have done something that no other product has done before. and we actually work it out with te dermatologists and chemists. we make sure these are legit. >> they've been scientifically tested and approved. >> completely. >> let's take a look at, starting first with the real weightless foundation from georgio armani, apparently five different oils instead of water or powder. >> and you know how foundation can feel thick and heavy, this one uses all the different oils which you think would be greasy, but they're really light oils, they evaporate on the skin, so you get the pure pigment. it's maestro foundation. >> amazing. >> those who suffer from r rosasia, there is no medical cure for this, but you did find this cream can be helpful. >> there's no cream over the counter for this. and what happens is there's too many blood cells underneath the surface of the skin and too reactive. so this aven cream, it's french. >> anti-redness. >> right. >> for chronic redness. it has a protein
and every like to possessors of political science speculating in the abstract about the nature of international politics. you may wonder why it was because of fact the only thing worth talking about was at that point whether we could establish enough confidence between the two of us to risky adventure that opening to china representative for both sides shown that point of view, from a domestic, political point of view. and even though the subject of president nixon to china, was the reason why i came, neither side mentioned it until about 12 hours before. i mention not only to say i believe it should be followed to get your object it straight before you start haggling about details. we had no choice. now every generation and then was a great reform and i cannot think of any other country where you could definitely say that the evolution that we have seen in the last 30 years, depending on the vision of one man, as in the case of no other chinese who had the vision and the courage to move china into the imaginative system and to engage the reform and instituting a market system.
things like this. really what they're saying is this is going to advance science. this is going to enable them to develop the next generation of space suit. the next generation of high pressure suit. the gentleman whose record is he going to break, joe kitinger, he did this 52 years ago, and they base the space suits for the apollo and mercury missions on his space suit, on his high pressure suit. with the suit that felix is using, if it's going to work, they'r going to be able to develop other space missions with astronauts wearing a very similar kind of suit. >> he really is fearless. we wish him all the best. thank you, brian. we'll be watching. sxwlirchlgts poll numbers have dropped after the debate last week. we'll look at how these numbers break down in the swing states, and don't forget, can you watch cnn live on your computer while you're at work at cnn.com/26. an. why they have a raise your rate cd. tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economics, and one of the most cited economists in the world. professor sargent, can you tell me what cd rates will be in two year
100,000 math and science teachers, focus on early childhood education, provide job training for 2 million workers at community colleges, cut the growth of tuition costs in half, so you guys are not loaded up with that when you graduate. -- debt when you graduate. that is something we can do. i do not just talk the talk. i walk the block. -- walk the walk. under the student loan program, we cut out the middleman and gave the money directly to students. across the country, here we are getting better deals on programs, keeping rates low -- on pell grants, keeping rates low. we can meet these goals together. you can choose a better future for america. i want to use the money we are saving for ending the war is in iraq and afghanistan and use that to pay down our debt, but also put people to work rebuilding our roads and our bridges. governor romney said it was tragic to end the war in iraq. i disagree. i think bringing our troops home to their families was the right thing to do. if he had gotten his way, those troops would still be there. in his speech yesterday, he double down on tha
to push the boundaries of science and technology so are innovators and entrepreneurs can start these companies. to think about that as a form of success, in education, roughly 30% of high-school students drop out. we used to leave the world in high school graduates. we no longer. on infrastructure, we are $2 trillion in the deficit in terms of the infrastructure. on immigration, we have a policy where we give you a great education and then get the hell out. 1b're still fighting simple h visa issues. i do not think we have in any way remedied this. on government-funded research, it looks like any cagy headed to -- ekg heading to a heart attack. on each one of those indices that has made as great, i see is not going in the direction that we should be. for me, that is the alarm bell and the peptalk have been trying to put forth. >> i will ask the same question to you. are we a strong as we have ever been or are there ways you see a measurable in meaningful decline? >> to me, it's obvious we're not as strong as we have ever been for the reasons that tom has just enumerated but also
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)